café for contemporary art

Odds and Sods

Posted in posts by Tim, Recent Complicities by Tim on June 8, 2011

Hey guys! Long time no talk. I’m back from Montréal and back at work…I was planning on being back earlier but I got sidelined when I had my wisdom teeth taken out. I promptly developed dry sockets and was put on synthetic morphine for a week. Needless to say, working would have been more than a little difficult at that point.

Anyway, what’s new at cafca? A lot of things, actually. First, for the coffee geeks: we got new burrs and a new adjustment ring for our Anfims, and new precision filter baskets for the Synesso. It amazes me how changes like these affect the coffee we serve!

Speaking of coffee, right now we are offering 4 single-origin brews from 49th: Colombia Los Idolos Microlot, El Salvador La Providencia Estate, and two Ethiopian Yirgacheffes: Kochere and Organic Amaro Gayo. They’re all really nice, but right now I’m really digging the Amaro Gayo and La Providencia on Brewt and Aeropress. Stop by while I’m working sometime and I’ll make you one if you ask really nicely 😉

Next up: the art frontier. Our current exhibit is from a very talented young artist named Dylan Humphreys. It’s got a very urban and improvised feel to it – I like it a lot. It’s one of my favourite exhibits we’ve had so far. Drop by and see the space; it looks incredible!

And that’s a quick summary of what’s been going on lately. We’ve got some really cool live music and even a “rockumentary” lined up for later this summer, so stay tuned!

LOL,

Tim

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Sound/Proof: an exhibition of sound art by Frederick Brummer

Posted in Uncategorized by tyler057 on February 12, 2011

 
 
 
 
 

Sound/Proof: an exhibition of sound art by Frederick Brummer

February 11 – March 13

café for contemporary art
140 East Esplanade
North Vancouver, BC
Canada, V7L 4X9
tel: 778-340-3379
map

 

 
 
 
 

 

 

Café for Contemporary Art is proud to welcome “Sound/Proof: an exhibition of sound art by Frederick Brummer” to our main gallery.

Frederick Brummer makes one-of-a-kind sound machines.

Playfully combining musical instruments, sensors and effects devices with everyday objects he offers a tactile, analogue, experiential approach to electronic music. With a down tone aesthetic that may be considered somewhat Canadian (in a wool sweater, pastiche kind of way), the objects themselves combine various electronics with materials that are often second-hand or well used, making for approachable, comfortable space-mates with unique abilities.

The artist himself is deferential, polite, not wishing to impose, but at the same time, a witty, playful perfectionist who is willing to experiment and make some noise; a fun guy to hang out with who you wouldn’t be shy about bringing over to your grandma’s house. And this is clearly understood when experiencing his art.

Brummer grew up in a material environment full of guitars, four-tracks, distortion pedals and kind creative music making people. He was later altered through the influence of a seven years long experience in Japan where along with various differences in social norms, due to spatial and material constraints all he had room to create musically was digital. In large part, we have these constraints to thank for invigorating him, upon his return to Canada, to create an extensive series of hybrid, interactive sound sculptures that meld the digital with the analogue, the rustic with the electronic and return music making to a tactile experience of the body.

A relatively young artist, musician, interactivity designer and co-organiser of Vancouver’s premier electronic music festival, Square Waves, Brummer has exhibited at various venues including W2, The Vancouver Art Gallery, The Surrey Art Gallery and Telus World of Science. Meanwhile his music has taken him up and down the West Coast of North America and throughout Asia and Europe. His is an exciting practice and hopefully this exhibition will help to bring further attention to his work and help propel him on his way.

In addition to the sound sculptures being on display and available for play until March 13, they will be used in the following series of musical performances featuring friends and associates of the artist:

Saturday, February 12
Jesse Gentes, Destanne Lundquist

Saturday, February 19
Julian Gosser, Keenan O’Connor

Saturday, February 26
Control Voltage, Spectrum Interview

Saturday, March 5
Kristen Roos, Josh Hite, Corner, 30stone

***all music events begin at 8pm***
***entrance is by donation***

For more information contact:

Tyler
1-778-989-8325
http://www.cafeforcontemporaryart.com

ID in NV Industrial Design in North Vancouver

Posted in exhibitions by tyler057 on October 8, 2010

 

Image Courtesy Mark Teasdale

 

This exhibition is up for just a few more days. Comes down on October 14. Catch it while you can!

An industrial design exhibition curated by Adrian Boston,  ID in NV: Industrial Design in North Vancouver celebrates recent, innovative work by five North Vancouver firms Arc’teryx, Cove Bikes, Kelvin.23, Bull Monkey/G3 and Rayne Longboards. While offering a platform for the acknowledgment of interesting stuff going on in our midst the exhibition implicitly gives rise to questions about how communities negotiate living identities in the context of constantly emerging material culture.

The Press Release:

Curator provokes community to consider the collection and exhibition of contemporary cultural objects

Does the North Vancouver Museum and Archives own a Cove Bikes SHOCKER DH prototype? Or an early model Kelvin.23? Or any recently, locally designed objects of the North Shore? If so, how effectively are they empowered to make the local community aware of such a fact? The current exhibition at the Café for Contemporary Art, ID in NV: Industrial Design in North Vancouver, curated by Adrian Boston, features and celebrates a selection of objects recently designed on the North Shore. The exhibition provokes and facilitates an ongoing conversation about how we go about constituting and negotiating our collective memory. One of the central questions apparent in the exhibition surrounds the relationship between design and place. Ours is an increasingly virtual world that, on the surface seems to have lost its need for a notion of place. However, some local designers, while finding markets both at home and abroad, are designing specifically out of their experiences of this place. Considering these objects, this exhibition has us looking for answers to questions our community needs to ask itself; What do these objects mean about who we are? How do they reflect our current needs as a culture? Are we even a we? And how do these objects feature in the idea of that we? Is there actually ID in NV? And if there is, is it something to be NV’d, shared, questioned or what.

With the recent development of condos, a hotel and more to come in the Eastern Quarter of Lower Lonsdale, a great though long decayed monument to a particular aspect of local history, shipbuilding, has been lost. We are now left, with more than simply the task of completing the site’s redevelopment. We face huge questions around how this ever changing community (especially as its demographic shifts with an increasing wave of new residents from near and far) will go about giving form to collective memory while leaving space for present and future developments in the notion of who we are.

What can we bring together and celebrate collectively? How can different aspects of the community come together to learn about how one another’s local presence came to be and what contributions they might have to offer? Under what frameworks can old and new relationships be negotiated and allowed to prosper? What is our place in an increasingly global and virtual world?

Culminating in this current exhibition, over the past year and a half the Café for Contemporary Art has been very seriously engaged with these sorts of questions. Our second exhibition The Sinixt Don’t Make Totem Poles Either: Public, Art, Memory, set a Canadian case of genocide as the backdrop to an examination of how a new generation of British Columbian artists, self-aware as inheritors of a colonial history, shift their posture vis-à-vis the landscape to which their identity is expected (Group of Seven, Emily Carr) to be anchored. With Seung-Young Kim’s Self-Portrait, we were introduced to a post-colonial Korean who through artistic projects has sought to constitute a new notion self. Kim’s has been a very personal journey whereby he has not only sought to bridge the tricky waters of the relationship between Korea and its former colonizer, Japan, but in an increasingly transnational world has found himself swimming against strong tides of racial prejudice to actualize a colour-blind approach to personal and social relationships. Exiled and non-exiled Persian cultural voices, that sense a loss of modernity from a perhaps unexpected angle, were the focus of the Nowruz Arts Festival and the exhibition of Mansouri Moslem’s The Final Word: A Film about Shamlou. Their loss is one of a historically rich and relatively free arts scene, characterized not by its reverence for Islam, but rather by its secular celebration and examination of the human experience. With Adrian Buitenhuis’ exhibitions of Woodfibre and Highway 99 we have watched a young local film-maker/artist contemplate memory and loss in the very specific context the Howe Sound region in transition. And with VERSITILE a photo exhibit that coincided with the opening of the Pinnacle Hotel, artist Marie Berg reminded the community of what the place looked like not so long ago.

All of this was prefaced by We Love You Comrade Navin! an exhibition of the Navin Party. Navin Rawanchaikul and Tyler Russell’s ongoing collaboration, that, in an increasingly transnational and virtual world, looks at the diminishing role of State names and narratives in the constitution of human identities.

ID in NV and its preceding exhibition history are particularly relevant as this community looks to re-envision the function of Lower Lonsdale’s Eastern Quarter, and in particular what has come to be known as the National Maritime Centre site. With visioning sessions and a flurry of proposals on the horizon, it is hoped that the past will be honoured and the present and future empowered, as one of Canada’s last sections of publicly owned, high-profile harborfront is slated for re-development. We are the inheritors of a rich, complex and contested history with a future cultural and material possibility not shared by many others. It is with these facts front of mind that we must move forward, and discover for ourselves whether or not there really is ID in NV and if it is something we can share through conversations with the rest of the world.

Café for Contemporary Art, a 2010 Krups Kup of Excellence finalist and home to the North Shore’s only Clover makes room for art by providing the community with tasty homemade, soups, sandwiches and baked goods and exquisite coffee roasted by Vince Piccolo’s 49th Parallel Coffee Roasters.

We Are Open:

Weekdays: 7am-7pm

Weekends: 8am-7pm

Gallery Hop 2010 Vancouver

Posted in art by Robyn P. Yager on May 7, 2010

Exciting news!!!

Cafe for Contemporary Art is involved in the Canadian Art Foundation’s Gallery Hop 2010 Vancouver, on May 29th.

Since 1996, the Canadian Art Gallery Hop has “provided free gallery talks and mobilized audiences for art” in both Toronto and Vancouver. The event “acts as [an] educational vehicle to provide access and information for the art interested public with a day of engaging and enlightening discussions at local art galleries with art-world insiders sharing their views on general topics in the visual arts” (quotes courtesy of Canadian Art Foundation).

The day begins with a conversation and book launch at 11am-12:30pm at the Vancity Theatre, with curators Kitty Scott and Douglas Fogle as well with artists Lisa Anne Auerbach and Althea Thauberger.

Gallery tours and talks continue on in the day at various galleries throughout Vancouver from 1:30pm-5pm, followed by a special screening and reception for Tamra Davis’ documentary, Jean-Michel Basquiat: The Radiant Child again at the Vancity Theatre.

These various events require tickets which you can buy here and more information on the Gallery Hop (times, other participating galleries, etc.) can be found at the event microsite.

We’re so excited to be involved in this!!

(image courtesy of Canadian Art Foundation)

Seung-Young Kim: Self-Portrait

Posted in art, exhibitions by tyler057 on September 16, 2009

CafCA is buzzing as we set up for  Sueng-Young Kim: Self Portrait, marking the Korean artist’s first international solo exhibition. The show features documentation of three performance works that occurred in New York City and on a flotilla in the waters between Korea and Japan, focusing on themes of identity and globalization (see below for an overview of the works)  We’re holding an opening this Saturday, September 19th from 7-9pm, with the artist in attendance; come by for good coffee and conversation.

Also, on Sunday afternoon (around 1pm), as a playful nod to one of Kim’s pieces, we’ll be flying paper airplanes in the park across the street. Hope to see you this weekend!
__________________________________________

Paper Airplane Project, (Marcus Garvey Memorial Park, Harlem)

Seung-Young Kim: Self-Portrait

September 19th – October 25th, 2009
Opening Reception: September 19th, 7-9pm

café for contemporary art
140 East Esplanade Ave.
North Vancouver, BC
V7L 4X9, Canada

__________________________________________

Café for Contemporary Art proudly presents, Seung-Young Kim’s first international solo exhibition. Seung-Young Kim: Self-Portrait is an exhibition of select works from the artist produced while participating as an artist in residence in New York’s PS1 International Studio Program (1999-2000), and, during a process of exchange between Korea and Japan. This exhibition is a part of the Café for Contemporary Art’s dynamic line of exhibitions aimed at exploring the contemporary negotiation of life, identity and relationships in an age of global migration that continues to be tainted by the experiences of colonialism.

Seung-Young Kim has used his artistic practice as a means to explore the relationship between memory and the fluid constitution of the self. Straddling a space between an outward challenge of encountering and joining the cultural other and an inward desire for peace in the turmoil of the mind, Kim constructs spaces for contemplation and embarks on transformative cross-cultural encounters in his work. An engaging invitation to a shared inner-world of constant change, Kim’s work is removed from the ebb and flow of urban mania, pop-culture and mass-media, and refocuses on fundamental, ancient human questions of the self, relationships to community, nature’s role, and inter-communal relations. The challenges related to the transitional journey between cross-cultural social encounters in the face of inherited perceptions and unresolved historical tensions, are at the centre of the curatorial rationale for the selection of works in this show.

This exhibition is primarily a triptych with Kim’s Self-Portrait (1999) resting at its centre.  This is a video piece of the artist repeatedly posting a slightly larger than life-sized image of himself on a wall only to have it fall again and again.  This work stems from Kim’s experience of trying repeatedly to post a Joseph Beuys poster on the wall of his studio while in residency in New York. He was struck by the similarities of this repetitive act to his process of establishing himself in a foreign environment. Exhibited along with this work, are documents from two social encounter projects. One is Paper Airplane Project (2000), a simple project where Kim ventured into Harlem and made paper airplanes in a park. This will be the first ever exhibition of the photos from this project. And the second, Picnic on the Ocean (2002), where Kim and Japanese artist Hironori Murai (Kim’s studio neighbour at PS1) engaged in a long journey of preparing and realizing a picnic in the seas between Korea and Japan.

Through his works, Kim invites us to join him on these acts of encounter, and offers us an opportunity to consider the myriad of challenges faced in plodding through inherited social perceptions and lingering historical anguish.  Along the way, he opens doors to the possibility of constant renewal.

Seung-Young Kim: Self-Portrait runs from September 19th through to October 25th, with an opening reception on September 19th from 7-9pm.

A 24-page full colour pamphlet accompanies the exhibition.

This exhibition is supported by: Arts Council Korea

Emiliano Sepulveda has installed a little show…

Posted in architecture, art, dance, exhibitions, Recent Complicities, Uncategorized by tyler057 on September 6, 2009

In the little gap between the young architects/artists/sign-makers’ workshop that resulted in the Terminal Visions exhibition and Seung Young Kim’s upcoming exhibition (opens Sept 19) we are very happy to welcome an experimental installation/environment by Emiliano Sepulveda.  It doesn’t have a name yet, and maybe it never will, but it is lovely.

When Matthew, our beloved Matthew, learned that there was going to be a little gap between shows he said, hey, the other night I met this interesting guy, an artist, I don’t know exactly what it is that he is doing, but it seems really interesting, engaged in a sort of probing and translating of urban space.  What has resulted is a dance of urban light and form.

Emiliano’s show will be up for the duration of next week, closing on Sunday the 13th.  Come check it out if you get the chance.

Sunset @ CAFCA

Posted in posts by Tim by Tim on July 28, 2009

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The sunset after that surprise thunderstorm. More proof that we live in a very, very good place.

LOL,

Tim

Public Meeting Attendees Lend Art Project Overwhelming Support

Posted in exhibitions by tyler057 on May 20, 2009

Scott and Steve Proposal

The attendees of the Pinnacle Square Public Art Proposal meeting lent the project overwhelming support.

While there was one naysayer who left before the meeting got fully underway, the overwhelming majority of attendees seemed to really appreciate  how the installation would function to enrich the neighbourhood through Scott and Steve’s thoughtful engagement of the square’s current artwork Launch, by Elisabeth Roy.  Roy’s work comes with a plaque that says that the work “acknowledges the site’s transformation, from a workplace for the men and women who pioneered the community, to a place for the next generation to build upon.”  Accepting Roy’s invitation Scott and Steve begin the building upon by questioning the foundation, or the basic narrative within which Roy’s work functions.  Steve, displacing his zero from the original location of its guerilla installation, re-employs it in a disruption of the assumed temporal parameters of Roy’s work while allowing the consideration of new beginnings.  Meanwhile, Scott’s work, a self-portrait/welcome figure that awkwardly hovers in time between a pioneer past and a post-consumer present, questions simplistic and reassuring assumptions about pioneers.  Placing this un-selfassured person onto the landscape implies a shift in settler posture and self-image that may, like Steve’s zero, open doors to the consideration of the possibility of new beginnings.

While the attendees of the meeting gave great support for this particular installation, they also seemed invigorated by the fact that none of us are interested in a permanent installation, hoping instead that after a several months or a few years new works could be installed on the site transforming it into a space for ongoing cultural discussion through pubic art.  There was even talk of how it might be advantageous to the cultural vitality of the area if the public art agenda of the entire Pier developments could include an ongoing programme of periodically changing public art installations.  This discussion of course went hand in hand with talk of the re-location of the Presentation House Gallery to the area.

FYI, a handout presented at the meeting laid out the proposal in the following manner:

The Proposal:

Scott August and Steve Hubert propose the addition of two works to Pinnacle Square, namely Scott August’s twenty five foot tall die cut photo of himself representing a cowboy welcome figure wearing oven mitts and cut-off jeans and a replica of the zero Steve Hubert added to Vancouver’s Centennial Sculpture in October 2008.

3 Reasons to welcome the Pinnacle Square Public Art Proposal:

1.    The artwork enriches the neighbourhood by opening up a chance to imagine its past, present and future with a perspective that while inclusive of shipbuilder’s history is not solely bound to it.

2.    By showcasing a sense of humour, and a sense of being open to knowledge we don’t have full mastery or control of it welcomes the formation of a vibrant creative community that might not have otherwise been possible.  This, if Richard Florida’s theories about the implication of the rise of the creative class on real estate value have any meat to them, would in turn have positive effects on local real estate values.

3.     Rather than setting out First Nations and Settler narratives as parallel stories, it opens up a chance for narrative engagement between the communities.

Pinnacle Square Public Art Proposal – Public Meeting May 16, 3pm

Posted in Uncategorized by tyler057 on May 12, 2009
Scott August & Steven Hubert, Pinnacle Square Public Art Proposal, 2009

Scott August & Steven Hubert, Pinnacle Square Public Art Proposal, 2009

This Saturday (May 16) at 3pm in conjunction with our current exhibition Scott August and Steve Hubert will host a public meeting to discuss their proposal for a new public art installation in Pinnacle Square, a quasi-public space adjacent to the cafe. They propose that an oversized zero and a 25ft cowboy in cut-offs and oven mitts be installed in this little square in the middle of Lower Lonsdale.  Should be fun.  So far lots of people have expressed strong feelings both for and against.  If you are interested in vibrant discussions about public art, this will definitely be worth attending.
A press release sent out by greatroadsideattractions@gmail.com, an email address known to be affiliated with Scott August’s public installation practice argues that if the installation is permitted it would be a departure from typical memorialisations of settler history and open up space for broader understandings and imaginings of the geography they might one day be installed on.
Passerby Views Public Art Proposal Billboard in Pinnacle Square

Passerby Views Public Art Proposal Billboard in Pinnacle Square

People communicating with the cafe have offered all sorts of angles.   The comments range from “You guys are radical this is awesome!” “I have a degree in Art History, I get what you are doing.  This is absolutely great!” “So is this just a conceptual work or do they actually want to put these things up?” and “Vancouver needs to loosen up, you know, Andy Warhol once came here and said, people here don’t buy art because they’re too busy looking at the mountains” to “so how far is the proposal along?  Did you apply to the city?…  I just wanna let you know I’m not too keen, this is going to block my water view… you know you’ve upset lots of people in the building here, we felt pretty blindsided by this proposal”  and red faced not so subtle threats to send the lawyers.  Some question how a cowboy might be relevant to North Vancouver, why not a whale, a lumberjack or a ship builder people ask, or, why his face and not mine.  Another said, “maybe in Castlegar, but a cowboy here?  No way!  This is an upscale neighbourhood!”
For me, I’m just thankful for the conversation and think the proposal has been a magnificent addition to the overall exhibition.  In no more than proposal form these works have opened a window to the sensation of disorienting interventions in a claimed cultural space and sparked hope for an urban environment with a sense of humour.
Totem pole next to the Credit Union building, Edgewood, BC, 2005 Photo: Jutta Ploessner Source: http://www.firstnations.eu/invasion/sinixt.htm

Totem pole next to the Credit Union building, Edgewood, BC, 2005 Photo: Jutta Ploessner; http://www.firstnations.eu/invasion/sinixt.htm

In some ways and for some people I guess the proposal can act as a kind of clandestine cognate to the the Sinixt’s totem pole, which was erected by BC Hydro in the late 1960s as a memorial to an extinct race.  This was some 10 years after the Sinixt had been declared extinct, and the Columbia River Treaty had been signed, and a massive portion of Sinixt traditional territory had been flooded out with damns.  Among the many problems with that public art commission were the facts that the Sinixt weren’t extinct and that they, like most Salishan peoples including those who once lived in what is now known as Stanley Park, never made totem poles anyway.   It just didn’t/doesn’t make sense.

Considering the way in which much of our art (public or otherwise) continues to inform our understanding of the territory we live on (here in BC, but probably elsewhere too), it makes sense to grasp for other possibilities.  And rather than just going ahead and confidently offering an alternative set of narratives it is probably worthwhile to welcome broader questions about our concepts of time and the constitution of memory. Perhaps signs like Scott’s and Steve’s are in order.  In their abstraction, absurdity and bold humour  they have already proven to act as a play on the orientation of the cultural tables.  Who knows, in the long run they might actually be able to help crack open some space for broader understandings and imaginings of the territories they engage with.  Who knows…

The Sinixt Don’t Make Totem Poles Either: Public, Art, Memory

Posted in Uncategorized by tyler057 on May 7, 2009

Tonight we open our second exhibition! If you have a chance come on out!

Where: 140 East Esplanade, North Van.
When: May 7th, 6-9pm
What: An array of works by Scott August, Steven Hubert and Marilyn James that may come together to percolate discussions about memory, our relationships to the landscapes we inhabit, the role of public art, how diverse communities relate to one another and so on…

ps: We now serve Flat Whites and we are featuring Ethiopian single origin coffee this month…