café for contemporary art

ID in NV Industrial Design in North Vancouver

Posted in exhibitions by tyler057 on October 8, 2010

 

Image Courtesy Mark Teasdale

 

This exhibition is up for just a few more days. Comes down on October 14. Catch it while you can!

An industrial design exhibition curated by Adrian Boston,  ID in NV: Industrial Design in North Vancouver celebrates recent, innovative work by five North Vancouver firms Arc’teryx, Cove Bikes, Kelvin.23, Bull Monkey/G3 and Rayne Longboards. While offering a platform for the acknowledgment of interesting stuff going on in our midst the exhibition implicitly gives rise to questions about how communities negotiate living identities in the context of constantly emerging material culture.

The Press Release:

Curator provokes community to consider the collection and exhibition of contemporary cultural objects

Does the North Vancouver Museum and Archives own a Cove Bikes SHOCKER DH prototype? Or an early model Kelvin.23? Or any recently, locally designed objects of the North Shore? If so, how effectively are they empowered to make the local community aware of such a fact? The current exhibition at the Café for Contemporary Art, ID in NV: Industrial Design in North Vancouver, curated by Adrian Boston, features and celebrates a selection of objects recently designed on the North Shore. The exhibition provokes and facilitates an ongoing conversation about how we go about constituting and negotiating our collective memory. One of the central questions apparent in the exhibition surrounds the relationship between design and place. Ours is an increasingly virtual world that, on the surface seems to have lost its need for a notion of place. However, some local designers, while finding markets both at home and abroad, are designing specifically out of their experiences of this place. Considering these objects, this exhibition has us looking for answers to questions our community needs to ask itself; What do these objects mean about who we are? How do they reflect our current needs as a culture? Are we even a we? And how do these objects feature in the idea of that we? Is there actually ID in NV? And if there is, is it something to be NV’d, shared, questioned or what.

With the recent development of condos, a hotel and more to come in the Eastern Quarter of Lower Lonsdale, a great though long decayed monument to a particular aspect of local history, shipbuilding, has been lost. We are now left, with more than simply the task of completing the site’s redevelopment. We face huge questions around how this ever changing community (especially as its demographic shifts with an increasing wave of new residents from near and far) will go about giving form to collective memory while leaving space for present and future developments in the notion of who we are.

What can we bring together and celebrate collectively? How can different aspects of the community come together to learn about how one another’s local presence came to be and what contributions they might have to offer? Under what frameworks can old and new relationships be negotiated and allowed to prosper? What is our place in an increasingly global and virtual world?

Culminating in this current exhibition, over the past year and a half the Café for Contemporary Art has been very seriously engaged with these sorts of questions. Our second exhibition The Sinixt Don’t Make Totem Poles Either: Public, Art, Memory, set a Canadian case of genocide as the backdrop to an examination of how a new generation of British Columbian artists, self-aware as inheritors of a colonial history, shift their posture vis-à-vis the landscape to which their identity is expected (Group of Seven, Emily Carr) to be anchored. With Seung-Young Kim’s Self-Portrait, we were introduced to a post-colonial Korean who through artistic projects has sought to constitute a new notion self. Kim’s has been a very personal journey whereby he has not only sought to bridge the tricky waters of the relationship between Korea and its former colonizer, Japan, but in an increasingly transnational world has found himself swimming against strong tides of racial prejudice to actualize a colour-blind approach to personal and social relationships. Exiled and non-exiled Persian cultural voices, that sense a loss of modernity from a perhaps unexpected angle, were the focus of the Nowruz Arts Festival and the exhibition of Mansouri Moslem’s The Final Word: A Film about Shamlou. Their loss is one of a historically rich and relatively free arts scene, characterized not by its reverence for Islam, but rather by its secular celebration and examination of the human experience. With Adrian Buitenhuis’ exhibitions of Woodfibre and Highway 99 we have watched a young local film-maker/artist contemplate memory and loss in the very specific context the Howe Sound region in transition. And with VERSITILE a photo exhibit that coincided with the opening of the Pinnacle Hotel, artist Marie Berg reminded the community of what the place looked like not so long ago.

All of this was prefaced by We Love You Comrade Navin! an exhibition of the Navin Party. Navin Rawanchaikul and Tyler Russell’s ongoing collaboration, that, in an increasingly transnational and virtual world, looks at the diminishing role of State names and narratives in the constitution of human identities.

ID in NV and its preceding exhibition history are particularly relevant as this community looks to re-envision the function of Lower Lonsdale’s Eastern Quarter, and in particular what has come to be known as the National Maritime Centre site. With visioning sessions and a flurry of proposals on the horizon, it is hoped that the past will be honoured and the present and future empowered, as one of Canada’s last sections of publicly owned, high-profile harborfront is slated for re-development. We are the inheritors of a rich, complex and contested history with a future cultural and material possibility not shared by many others. It is with these facts front of mind that we must move forward, and discover for ourselves whether or not there really is ID in NV and if it is something we can share through conversations with the rest of the world.

Café for Contemporary Art, a 2010 Krups Kup of Excellence finalist and home to the North Shore’s only Clover makes room for art by providing the community with tasty homemade, soups, sandwiches and baked goods and exquisite coffee roasted by Vince Piccolo’s 49th Parallel Coffee Roasters.

We Are Open:

Weekdays: 7am-7pm

Weekends: 8am-7pm

cafca style

Posted in exhibitions, Uncategorized by Robyn P. Yager on May 17, 2010

Some of you may know that Cafe for Contemporary Art has a lot of merchandise for sale.

I would like to introduce you to some of t-shirts available at our cafe.

The designs of Afshin Sabouki, Adrian Boston, and Carla Trevisi are all available at our cafe!

Afshin Sabouki’s designs were created last year as a reaction to the elections in Iran.

$28.00

$28.00

(more…)

new exhibits, new members

Posted in art, exhibitions by Robyn P. Yager on May 5, 2010

Hello dear friends!

Sincere apologies for lack of updates on the site and blog, but today is a new day. Let me update you on some new things at Cafe for Contemporary Art.

First of all, this Friday is art opening for Cafca’s newest exhibition entitled: Perspectives on Community: Images on the theme of community by North Vancouver Secondary Students.

In previous years, North Vancouver’s Presentation House has held a similar exhibition for secondary students, however, due to lack of funding this year, the exhibition was unable to continue at that location. This year’s exhibition helps to further understand our communities and what a “community” means to its public. The contribution of high school students in such an exhibit adds a different perspective through viewing such a theme. We felt that it was crucial to provide these individuals with a space for expressing their thoughts, so, this year the exhibit will be held at Cafe for Contemporary Art.

Come down to Cafca on Friday May 7th at 5pm, to celebrate the opening of this exhibition and open a discussion on community and what it means. The exhibit will run until May 23, 2010.

We have just gotten word that we have been selected as one of the semi-finalist cafes in Vancouver for the Krups Kup of Excellence, created by KRUPS, a major supplier of personal coffee related equipment and appliances. “KRUPS developed this prestigious award to recognize the commitment of independent cafés to brewing superior-tasting espresso in a unique environment that celebrates Canadians’ passion for skillfully prepared coffee.” The 2009 winner of this award in Vancouver was 49th Parallel.
Public voting for the award will begin June 1st, 2010, so look for more information about this in the next few weeks.

Finally, I would like to introduce myself, Robyn Yager, as Cafe for Contemporary Art’s newest member. After visiting Cafca and speaking to Tyler about art, coffee, and his visions for his space I was immediately interested in the programs it was making available to the community and the area as well as its devotion to great coffee! As a result, here I am – dividing my time between making you espresso and managing much of Cafca’s communications. So, look forward to updates, and I will do my best to provide you dear friends with information on upcoming programs, gallery exhibits, and cafe news!

Sincerely,

Cafe for Contemporary Art (via Robyn Yager).

November exhibition at the cafe: LIVE COMMON GROUND

Posted in exhibitions by christinafroschauer on November 18, 2009

cafe for contemporary art presents…

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An art exhibition featuring works by local artists Ben Bogart,
Michael Filimowicz, Helgi Kristinsson, and Morgan Rauscher
.

Show Dates: November 8th to 29th, 2009
Opening Party:
Thursday, November 12th, 7pm – 9pm
CAFCA address: 140 East Esplanade, N. Vancouver. 778.340.3379

Café for contemporary art presents LIVE COMMON GROUND, an exhibition featuring the works by local artists: Ben Bogart, Michael Filimowicz, Helgi Kristinsson, and Morgan Rauscher. Brought together by common interest, each artist uses electronics and new media, in their own unique ways, as a medium for creative production.

Often falling under the guise of gaming art or digital art, the discipline of “electronic arts” includes these elements and more, expanding into the artistic realms of robotics, video, audio, music, internet, circuitry, digital, wireless, among others. Acting as a window into this vast and intricate discipline, the show invites the gallery attendees to learn more about electronic art practices and programming. Often embracing interaction as an aspect of their work, electronic and new media artists necessitate audience participation to contribute to the completion of their pieces. Café for contemporary offers a two piece program inviting the audience to look, physically engage with, and learn more about circuitry, net based art, interactive video, and audio visual works on show in the gallery space. And lining the walls of the cafe, diagrams, patches, text, and schematics, provide an intimate window into the artist’s process and the “how to” of what’s involved in creating and programming art with electronics.

Please come out, meet the artists, and join us in celebrating the opening on November 12, 2009, from 7pm to 9pm (food and refreshments will be served).

Contacts: christina froschauer.604.781.4018
café for contemporaryart.778.340.3379.
cafeforcontemporaryart@gmail.com


Stan Douglas – Stained Glass

Posted in About, art, exhibitions by tyler057 on September 22, 2009

Saturday night Seung-Young’s show opened well and many lovely people were by to check it out. Yesterday, we flew some paper airplanes at Waterfront Park and carried on to take Seung-Young and Jaehyun (his marvelous other half) for a day trip up the sea-to-sky highway. Today, along with Sung and Kiban (my better half and son) they enjoyed a day in town. Sung took them to go check out what might be on at the Vancouver Art Gallery, but when Seung-Young heard the ticket counter staff explain that all they really had on was a show of the Group of Seven and Stained Glass, it is understandable that he wasn’t so interested. Sadly, it was only on the ride home tonight that we discovered, it was just a lost-in-translation moment and not that he just had no interest in Stan Douglas… There is no stained glass show on at the VAG. And as far as I understand they don’t have any planned for the foreseeable future…

Seung-Young Kim: Self-Portrait

Posted in art, exhibitions by tyler057 on September 16, 2009

CafCA is buzzing as we set up for  Sueng-Young Kim: Self Portrait, marking the Korean artist’s first international solo exhibition. The show features documentation of three performance works that occurred in New York City and on a flotilla in the waters between Korea and Japan, focusing on themes of identity and globalization (see below for an overview of the works)  We’re holding an opening this Saturday, September 19th from 7-9pm, with the artist in attendance; come by for good coffee and conversation.

Also, on Sunday afternoon (around 1pm), as a playful nod to one of Kim’s pieces, we’ll be flying paper airplanes in the park across the street. Hope to see you this weekend!
__________________________________________

Paper Airplane Project, (Marcus Garvey Memorial Park, Harlem)

Seung-Young Kim: Self-Portrait

September 19th – October 25th, 2009
Opening Reception: September 19th, 7-9pm

café for contemporary art
140 East Esplanade Ave.
North Vancouver, BC
V7L 4X9, Canada

__________________________________________

Café for Contemporary Art proudly presents, Seung-Young Kim’s first international solo exhibition. Seung-Young Kim: Self-Portrait is an exhibition of select works from the artist produced while participating as an artist in residence in New York’s PS1 International Studio Program (1999-2000), and, during a process of exchange between Korea and Japan. This exhibition is a part of the Café for Contemporary Art’s dynamic line of exhibitions aimed at exploring the contemporary negotiation of life, identity and relationships in an age of global migration that continues to be tainted by the experiences of colonialism.

Seung-Young Kim has used his artistic practice as a means to explore the relationship between memory and the fluid constitution of the self. Straddling a space between an outward challenge of encountering and joining the cultural other and an inward desire for peace in the turmoil of the mind, Kim constructs spaces for contemplation and embarks on transformative cross-cultural encounters in his work. An engaging invitation to a shared inner-world of constant change, Kim’s work is removed from the ebb and flow of urban mania, pop-culture and mass-media, and refocuses on fundamental, ancient human questions of the self, relationships to community, nature’s role, and inter-communal relations. The challenges related to the transitional journey between cross-cultural social encounters in the face of inherited perceptions and unresolved historical tensions, are at the centre of the curatorial rationale for the selection of works in this show.

This exhibition is primarily a triptych with Kim’s Self-Portrait (1999) resting at its centre.  This is a video piece of the artist repeatedly posting a slightly larger than life-sized image of himself on a wall only to have it fall again and again.  This work stems from Kim’s experience of trying repeatedly to post a Joseph Beuys poster on the wall of his studio while in residency in New York. He was struck by the similarities of this repetitive act to his process of establishing himself in a foreign environment. Exhibited along with this work, are documents from two social encounter projects. One is Paper Airplane Project (2000), a simple project where Kim ventured into Harlem and made paper airplanes in a park. This will be the first ever exhibition of the photos from this project. And the second, Picnic on the Ocean (2002), where Kim and Japanese artist Hironori Murai (Kim’s studio neighbour at PS1) engaged in a long journey of preparing and realizing a picnic in the seas between Korea and Japan.

Through his works, Kim invites us to join him on these acts of encounter, and offers us an opportunity to consider the myriad of challenges faced in plodding through inherited social perceptions and lingering historical anguish.  Along the way, he opens doors to the possibility of constant renewal.

Seung-Young Kim: Self-Portrait runs from September 19th through to October 25th, with an opening reception on September 19th from 7-9pm.

A 24-page full colour pamphlet accompanies the exhibition.

This exhibition is supported by: Arts Council Korea

Emiliano Sepulveda has installed a little show…

Posted in architecture, art, dance, exhibitions, Recent Complicities, Uncategorized by tyler057 on September 6, 2009

In the little gap between the young architects/artists/sign-makers’ workshop that resulted in the Terminal Visions exhibition and Seung Young Kim’s upcoming exhibition (opens Sept 19) we are very happy to welcome an experimental installation/environment by Emiliano Sepulveda.  It doesn’t have a name yet, and maybe it never will, but it is lovely.

When Matthew, our beloved Matthew, learned that there was going to be a little gap between shows he said, hey, the other night I met this interesting guy, an artist, I don’t know exactly what it is that he is doing, but it seems really interesting, engaged in a sort of probing and translating of urban space.  What has resulted is a dance of urban light and form.

Emiliano’s show will be up for the duration of next week, closing on Sunday the 13th.  Come check it out if you get the chance.

Unfinished Speculative Architecture Thread #1

Posted in architecture, exhibitions by tyler057 on July 26, 2009

___

>>From: Holly

Hello city dreamers,

Firstly thank you all for the huge interest and enthusiasm in this project, I realise it is all a bit vague at the moment and I really appreciate the trust you all have in the project and eachother even before it has all begun, it makes me really excited!
So it all begins on Monday 9:30am at Cafe for Contemporary Art,  It’s really important that you try your best to make it on Monday to meet everyone and get a good break down of the brief followed by questions…. and for coffee. If you can not work full time on the project then this will be a great time to share your schedules with each other and work out some sweet synchronisation.
Monday afternoon will be organised on the spot and primarily for discussion and maybe a field trip to the site. If you can not stay in the afternoon this is fine – and we can give you notes about how you can get to the site.  I do think it may be important for some of you to go alone to the site to experience it in a solitary way, but to go in groups first might be easier and more fun. If you have a laptop/

cameras/drawing equipment/—-/ you may find it very useful to bring them along.

attached is a brief to look over in case you didn’t get an updated copy.

and finally: If you all could please email me an image or a piece of writing or visual work by tomorrow that would be perfect (for an artists bio)…
Thank you all! We’re looking forward to monday in a huge way,
see you all soon,
Holly (more…)

Speculative Architecture Series

Posted in exhibitions, Uncategorized by hollybeals on July 23, 2009

ON NOW: The Speculative Architecture Series, features the collaborative production of a cartographic installation of city imaginings. A group of eight artists, architects, urban planners, and film makers are presented with a framework of three words in which to map/to investigate a specific site in South Vancouver – they are: [TITLE], [TERMINAL 1], and [CARTOGRAPHIC].
As part of the exhibition there will be an 11 day production period where the artists will work from within the gallery as a ‘Performative Mapping of the Minds’ – a showcase of the creative process open for public viewing July 20 – July 31.
THE FINAL PRODUCTIONS OF THE TEAM OF ARTISTS + OTHER CITY IMAGININGS WILL OPEN AUGUST 1ST

thebrief
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Public Meeting Attendees Lend Art Project Overwhelming Support

Posted in exhibitions by tyler057 on May 20, 2009

Scott and Steve Proposal

The attendees of the Pinnacle Square Public Art Proposal meeting lent the project overwhelming support.

While there was one naysayer who left before the meeting got fully underway, the overwhelming majority of attendees seemed to really appreciate  how the installation would function to enrich the neighbourhood through Scott and Steve’s thoughtful engagement of the square’s current artwork Launch, by Elisabeth Roy.  Roy’s work comes with a plaque that says that the work “acknowledges the site’s transformation, from a workplace for the men and women who pioneered the community, to a place for the next generation to build upon.”  Accepting Roy’s invitation Scott and Steve begin the building upon by questioning the foundation, or the basic narrative within which Roy’s work functions.  Steve, displacing his zero from the original location of its guerilla installation, re-employs it in a disruption of the assumed temporal parameters of Roy’s work while allowing the consideration of new beginnings.  Meanwhile, Scott’s work, a self-portrait/welcome figure that awkwardly hovers in time between a pioneer past and a post-consumer present, questions simplistic and reassuring assumptions about pioneers.  Placing this un-selfassured person onto the landscape implies a shift in settler posture and self-image that may, like Steve’s zero, open doors to the consideration of the possibility of new beginnings.

While the attendees of the meeting gave great support for this particular installation, they also seemed invigorated by the fact that none of us are interested in a permanent installation, hoping instead that after a several months or a few years new works could be installed on the site transforming it into a space for ongoing cultural discussion through pubic art.  There was even talk of how it might be advantageous to the cultural vitality of the area if the public art agenda of the entire Pier developments could include an ongoing programme of periodically changing public art installations.  This discussion of course went hand in hand with talk of the re-location of the Presentation House Gallery to the area.

FYI, a handout presented at the meeting laid out the proposal in the following manner:

The Proposal:

Scott August and Steve Hubert propose the addition of two works to Pinnacle Square, namely Scott August’s twenty five foot tall die cut photo of himself representing a cowboy welcome figure wearing oven mitts and cut-off jeans and a replica of the zero Steve Hubert added to Vancouver’s Centennial Sculpture in October 2008.

3 Reasons to welcome the Pinnacle Square Public Art Proposal:

1.    The artwork enriches the neighbourhood by opening up a chance to imagine its past, present and future with a perspective that while inclusive of shipbuilder’s history is not solely bound to it.

2.    By showcasing a sense of humour, and a sense of being open to knowledge we don’t have full mastery or control of it welcomes the formation of a vibrant creative community that might not have otherwise been possible.  This, if Richard Florida’s theories about the implication of the rise of the creative class on real estate value have any meat to them, would in turn have positive effects on local real estate values.

3.     Rather than setting out First Nations and Settler narratives as parallel stories, it opens up a chance for narrative engagement between the communities.